October 25, 2014

Kids in Beekeeping

Jack and his Dad took a short class from Master Beekeeper, Rick Cooper.  Jack then got everything he needed to become a beekeeper as a  present. The following pictures are of Jack and his brother, Brad, checking Jack’s new hive.

This is Jack's brother Brad.  Jack took off the roof and top feeder from the hive.  The top feeder was sitting on top of the inner cover.   Now, Brad is taking the protective deep hive body off the inner cover.

This is Jack's brother Brad. Jack took off the roof and top feeder from the hive. The top feeder was sitting on top of the inner cover. Now, Brad is taking the protective deep hive body off the inner cover.

 	  With the inner cover removed, Jack gives the bees a puff of smoke.   This makes the bees gorge themselves on honey.  This occupies the bees so they aren't as interested  in what  is going on around them.  Then the beekeeper can get a closer look into the hive.

With the inner cover removed, Jack gives the bees a puff of smoke. This makes the bees gorge themselves on honey. This occupies the bees so they aren't as interested in what is going on around them. Then the beekeeper can get a closer look into the hive.

 	  Here we see Jack using his hive tool to loosen the frames from the hive body.  The bees make a glue called propolis.  This is what they use to seal cracks, plug holes, coat foreign items in the hive, and glue loose things together with.  The bees don't like anything in the hive that is loose or vibrates.  So, they glue it.

Here we see Jack using his hive tool to loosen the frames from the hive body. The bees make a glue called propolis. This is what they use to seal cracks, plug holes, coat foreign items in the hive, and glue loose things together with. The bees don't like anything in the hive that is loose or vibrates. So, they glue it.

 	  We see Jack getting all of the frames loose with his hive tool.  Brad is working at getting the end frame out first.  This makes more room in the hive to pull out the other frames.  It's also safer, so you don't smash any of the bees in the hive.  Then it makes it easier to get a good, close look at each frame.

We see Jack getting all of the frames loose with his hive tool. Brad is working at getting the end frame out first. This makes more room in the hive to pull out the other frames. It's also safer, so you don't smash any of the bees in the hive. Then it makes it easier to get a good, close look at each frame.

This is Brad with a frame of brood from the brood chamber.  The brood chamber is where the queen lays her eggs.  The eggs hatch into larva and are fed by worker bees called nurse bees.  The larva are sealed with food in the wax comb and transform into a pupa.  The pupa then hatches into a bee.  If the queen lays a fertilized egg, it  will become a worker bee.  If the queen lays an unfertized egg, then it will become a drone.  The drone is a male honey bee and the workers are all females.  The bees can create a queen by feeding a fertilized larva royal jelly and by leaving a large amount of royal jelly in the queen cell for the pupa.  Then when the pupa hatches, it's a queen.

This is Brad with a frame of brood from the brood chamber. The brood chamber is where the queen lays her eggs. The eggs hatch into larva and are fed by worker bees called nurse bees. The larva are sealed with food in the wax comb and transform into a pupa. The pupa then hatches into a bee. If the queen lays a fertilized egg, it will become a worker bee. If the queen lays an unfertized egg, then it will become a drone. The drone is a male honey bee and the workers are all females. The bees can create a queen by feeding a fertilized larva royal jelly and by leaving a large amount of royal jelly in the queen cell for the pupa. Then when the pupa hatches, it's a queen.

Thank you Jack and Brad, for sharing your  pictures with us.

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