December 20, 2014

The Bee Hive in Winter – 2009-2010

A bee call November 29,2009 [40°F] brought Christy Hemenway to Alna to try and help this exposed wild hive. What’s going on here? Picture this:a queen leads a swarm away from the parent hive in June and clusters on a pine tree branch. All of the bees have just gorged themselves on honey and nectar in preparation. This consumption leads to the workers’wax glands going into production.Combine this with days and days of rain which make further scouting for a safe,protected hollow impossible. Workers start building a few cells to store resources.Thequeenstartslaying.Allofasudden,brood is present. The impulse to care for the brood outweighs a genuine need to find better living quarters.They keep building. NOT a promising way to winter in Maine.

by Tony Jadczak, Maine Apiarist Unlike the majority of northern insects, honey bees cannot survive freezing and do not hibernate. In fact, the reason honey bees gather and store surplus honey is for con- sumption during the winter months when flowers are absent and temperatures are too cold for flight. The bees store honey above and around their cluster and move up into the honey reserves … [Read more...]

2006 Inspection Report

State Apiarist Tony Jadczak shares his report of Maine apiaries for 2 010.

Apiary Inspection- In 2006, 479 Maine beekeepers registered 7,476 hives. 52,107 hives managed by migratory commercial beekeepers entered Maine primarily for blueberry and apple pollination. Hives were also used to pollinate canola, cranberry, small fruits, squash and buckwheat. Honey bee colonies entered Maine under certification from AR, FL, GA, KS, LA, MS, SC and TX. In 2006, 5,672 hives were … [Read more...]

Inspector’s Comments – April 2006

Tony Jadczak, Maine State Bee Inspector

True to form, “March came in like a lion and went out like a lamb”. Honey bees were gathering pollen in the southern half of the state during the last week of March when temperatures reached the upper 50’s and lower 60’s. The sight of incoming pollen is possibly as welcome to northern beekeepers as it is to the bees.   During April, bee management concerns monitoring the hive’s food … [Read more...]

2005 Inspection Report

Tony Jadczak – State of Maine Apiarist and Bee Inspector

In 2005, 380 Maine beekeepers registered 6,436 hives. In addition, 52,668 hives managed by migratory commercial beekeepers entered Maine for blueberry, apple, and cranberry pollination. Hives were also used to pollinate canola, small fruits, squash, and buckwheat. Honey bee colonies entered Maine under certification from AR, FL, GA, KS, LA, MS, SC, and TX. Nearly 6,000 colonies were shipped to … [Read more...]

2004 Inspection Report

State Apiarist Tony Jadczak shares his report of Maine apiaries for 2 010.

Following is a brief summary of the 2004 season. In 2004, 379 resident beekeepers registered 6,296 hives. The trend of fewer registered beekeepers and hives within Maine continues and reflects the decline of beekeepers and hives at the national level. Unfortunately, part of this “decline” is attributed to non-compliance with Maine’s Apiary Registration requirement. In contrast, there is excellent … [Read more...]