June 23, 2017

Guidance: How to Deal with Bears and Bees

from information provided by Judy Camuso, Wildlife Biologist, MDIFW Bears are often hungry in the spring (there is less food available and the females are feeding their young), and spring is when we typically get the most “nuisance” bear complaints. Our primary recommendation to people is pretty basic: remove the food source, so… take down bird feeders, feed pets indoors, keep all trash … [Read more...]

Dennis vanEngels­dorp Speaking at the 2011 Annual Meeting

Morbidity and Mortality in the Bee Yard.... and what to do about it? PART I Dennis vanEngels­dorp Speaking at the Maine State Beekeepers Association Annual Meeting Saturday, October 15, 2011 Lewiston, Main … [Read more...]

Swarm Catching: A Fun [Club] Opportunity?

We're now just a month away from the kickoff of our honey bee swarm season in Maine. With a little preparation, and the right attitude, we can have fun rescuing some of Mother Nature's most healthy, robust colonies. Without our help, they are probably in for a short lifespan as a feral colony in a small tree, your neighbor's attic, or even worse, stuck out in the open come late … [Read more...]

When Disaster Strikes

In late winter, beekeepers often find themselves thinking about their bees. Apprehension is most common when the previous fall had dismal honey production and when houses creak and snap on bone-chilling nights during January and February. Unfortunately, there isn’t much northern beekeepers can do during the dead of winter. At best, newspaper can be added on top of fiberboards of live hives that … [Read more...]

Nuc Transportation & Installation

Prior to nuc pickup, the empty hive (i.e. bottom board, hive body, five or six frames of foundation and/or comb, entrance reducer, inner cover, outer cover, empty hive body, sugar syrup, feeder) should be assembled and prepared for installation. The hive should be located at the apiary site in accordance with the MSBA’s “Best Management Practices for Beekeeping” found at mainebeekeepers.org. In … [Read more...]

How to Mark a Queen Bee

Erin MacGregor-Forbes of Overland Apiaries Demonstrates Marking a Queen Bee at a Nuc Making Workshop of the Cumberland County Beekeepers Association. It is common practice to mark the queen with a small spot of paint on her back (thorax). A color code exists within the beekeeping industry to indicate the year the queen was introduced. International Queen Marking Color … [Read more...]

Spring Management

Wintered honey bee colonies should be checked by early or mid-March for the amount and position of honey stores. Remove the outer cover and note the position of the cluster. In moderate temperatures, strong hives will often have bees present on the inner  cover, chewing and/or drinking the water from the insulation material that was placed above the inner cover the previous fall.  In cold … [Read more...]

Open Feeding Pollen Substitute for Honey Bees

Erin MacGregor-Forbes of Overland Apiaries describes open feeding of honeybees after the flow has shut off for the season. Especially useful in urban areas where you don't want your bees bothering the neighbors. Includes recipe for Open Feeding Pollen Substitute for Honey Bees. … [Read more...]

MSBA Fall 2010 Annual Meeting – Business Session

MSBA Fall 2010 Annual Meeting - Business Session Held at Hannaford Hall in the Abromson Center of the University of Southern Maine in Portland. … [Read more...]

MSBA Fall 2010 Annual Meeting – Welcome from the President

MSBA Fall 2010 Annual Meeting - Welcome from the President Held at Hannaford Hall in the Abromson Center of the University of Southern Maine in Portland. … [Read more...]